Monthly Archives: July 2013

You can’t force yourself to like bitter chocolates.

Certain jobs require distinct personality. There is little point in pursuing a job in communications if you are not an extroverted person who loves to interact with people. If your soul is bursting with passionate creativity, you are not likely to be content with a job in sales accounting.

Personalities is like shoe sizes. They are not subject to our choice or preference, but they can be occasionally fudged-with uncomfortable consequences.

It is neither an accomplishment nor a fault to acknowledge that some people can speak before large audiences and be exhilarated by the experience while others would be petrified. Some people can study an equation for years and still be fascinated by it, and others would long for human interaction and variety.

Realize who you are-what your true personality is-and choose a future that fits it.

Hardly a day goes by without at least one of his clients refusing to work with him. In fact, sometimes they spit up on him. But photographer Jean Deer loves his job.

He has taken hundreds of children’s portraits, and he is well acquainted with all the tricks of the trade to make a baby smile. Jean’s an expert in every funny face and noise imaginable.

“When it’s over-the parents-me, everyone is exhausted, but that’s usually a good sign.” Jean found that getting babies to flash their smiles wasn’t the only way to get a great picture and that a grumpy baby was just another source of inspiration. “I was taking a photo of this infant once who literally wanted nothing to do with me. He would not look up, just stared at the floor.” Jean got down on the floor with him took the picture from a perspective he’d never used before and wound up with one of the best pictures he’d ever taken.

The job requires two major traits, jean believes, “Not everyone can just hang out a shingle and call himself a photographer. It’s a matter of being patient and energetic and then capturing at the right moment.

“Even as people experience different phases of their lives, including career and family changes, their underlying personality remains constant after about age sixteen.”

                                                                                                                                                -Barto 1998.

 

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Rising to Victory

Pursuing your goals is like putting together a jigsaw puzzle. While you ultimately seek the final outcome, you still have to work piece by piece.

Since you will spend most of your time trying to make progress, you must enjoy what you are doing in order to finish. Take joy from the process, and use all the small success to fuel your continued efforts.

Louis Minella spent a career planning every detail of the presentation of department stores. He knew everything about the business of catching the customer’s eye and using the lay out to maximize sales.

After thirty one years in this business, he took early retirement. And then he looked for something worthwhile to do.

Louis decided to open a mailing center, where people can ship packages, buy boxes, make copies and send faxes. It was a major adjustment. “I used to be just one member of the team in an international organization, but now I’m in charge of everything.”

The hand on difference was most significant. “Before, I was dealing with group managers. I used to issue reports and orders, but I didn’t personally do the work or do anything other than tell other people what to do. I’m in reality now.”

He takes great joy from the daily hurdles overcome, like adjusting the hours of his star sixty-six years old employee to keep her content or fixing the leaking ink in the postage meter machine or figuring out how to copy a seven hundred page document.

“It’s a different ball game here, but it’s tremendously satisfying to learn every little thing that your business needs.”

“Life satisfaction is 22 percent more likely for those with a steady stream of minor accomplishments than those who express interest only in major accomplishments.”

                                                                                       -Orlick 1998

Source : Internet.

Inventing, Experimenting, Growing, Taking Risks, Breaking rules, Making mistakes, having fun & Living out loud.

Everyone wants to think of something new. Everyone wants to solve a problem no one else can solve, offer a valuable idea no one has ever conceived of. And every business wants to encourage its employees to have the next great idea.

So when a business offers its employees a bonus for creative ideas, a flood of great, original thoughts should come pouring in, right? We think that creativity, like any other task, can be bought and sold. But creativity is not the same as hard work and effort. It requires genuine inspiration. It is the product of a mind thoroughly intrigued by a question, a situation, a possibility.

Thus, creativity comes not in exchange for money or rewards but when we focus our attention on something because we want to.

Japan railways east had the contract to build a bullet train between Tokyo and Nagano to be put in the place in time for the 1998 winter Olympics.

Unfortunately, tunnels built by the company through the mountains kept filling the water. The company brought in a team of engineers who were highly paid to come up with the best solution. The engineers analyzed the problems and drew up an extensive set of plans to build an expensive drain and a system of aqueducts to divert the water out of the tunnels.

A thirsty maintenance worker one day came up with a different solution when he bent over and took a large swallow of the tunnel water. It tasted great, better than the bottled water he had in his lunch pail.

He told his boss they should bottle it and sell it as a premium mineral water. Thus was born Oshimizu bottled water, which the railroad sells from vending machines on its platforms and has expanded to selling by home delivery. A huge cost was transformed into a huge profit, all by looking at the situation differently.

Experiments offering money in exchange for creative solutions to problems find that monetary rewards are unrelated to the capacity of people to offer original ideas. Instead, creativity is most frequently the product of genuine interest in the problem and belief that creativity will be personally appreciated by superiors.

-Cooper, Clasen, Silva-Jalonen, and Butler 1999.

 

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Elementary, My dear Watson.

A civil action was filed on 14th February 2013 (Valentines Day) in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois against the Arthur Conan Doyle Estate by Sherlock Holmes scholar Leslie S. Klinger. Klinger seeks to have the Court determine that the characters of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John H. Watson are no longer protected by federal copyright laws and that writers, filmmakers, and others are free to create new stories about Holmes, Watson, and others of their circle without paying license fees to the current owners of the remaining copyrights.

Klinger says that the litigation came about because he and Laurie R. King, best-selling author of the “Mary Russell” series of mysteries that also feature Sherlock Holmes, were co-editing a new book called “In the Company of Sherlock Holmes.”  This collection of stories by major mystery/sci-fi/fantasy authors inspired by the Holmes tales, is to be published by Pegasus Books. “The Conan Doyle Estate contacted our publisher,” says Klinger, “and implied that if the Estate wasn’t paid a license fee, they’d convince the major distributors not to sell the book. Our publisher was, understandably, concerned, and told us that the book couldn’t come out unless this was resolved.

“It is true that some of Conan Doyle’s stories about Holmes are still protected by the U.S. copyright laws. However, the vast majority of the stories that Conan Doyle wrote are not. The characters of Holmes, Watson, and others are fully established in those fifty ‘public-domain’ stories. Under U.S. law, this should mean that anyone is free to create new stories about Holmes and Watson.

“This isn’t the first time the Estate has put pressure on creators,” Klinger adds. “It is the first time anyone has stood up to them. In the past, many simply couldn’t afford to fight or to wait for approval, and have given in and paid off the Estate for ‘permission.’ I’m asking the Court to put a permanent stop to this kind of bullying. Holmes and Watson belong to the world, not to some distant relatives of Arthur Conan Doyle.”

Klinger denies that he was trying to strip the Estate of its proper rights. “The Estate still owns copyrights in the U.S. on 10 of the stories about Holmes—some of the stories that appeared in The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes. As a lawyer myself, I respect those rights, and in fact I licensed them when I published my New Annotated Sherlock Holmes.”

All of the remaining 10 stories will be in the public domain after 2022, 95 years after the last was published.

Klinger is represented by Scott M. Gilbert of Hinshaw & Culbertson LLC in Chicago, who serves as litigation counsel, and Jonathan Kirsch in Los Angeles, an intellectual property attorney specializing in publishing issues.

“Les Klinger is the ideal plaintiff to undertake this praiseworthy effort to confirm the public-domain status of the iconic characters and settings of the Sherlock Holmes Canon and remove the cloud of fear, uncertainty and doubt that the Estate has used to scare off others,” says Kirsch.  “As a world-renowned expert and an acclaimed author, he is willing to champion a cause that others have been too timid to undertake.  Authors, movie-makers and other creative people owe him a debt of gratitude.”

Klinger and Laurie R. King previously edited A Study in Sherlock: Stories Inspired by the Sherlock Holmes Canon (Random House, 2011), a collection of new stories written by Lee Child, Neil Gaiman, Margaret Maron, and other contemporary writers. Their second collection, In the Company of Sherlock Holmes, will feature new stories by Sara Paretsky, Michael Connelly, Lev Grossman, Larry Niven, Val McDermid, Denise Mina, Cornelia Funke, Jeffery Deaver, and other major writers. Some of the stories are new adventures of Holmes and Watson; others are about people inspired or influenced by the Holmes stories of Conan Doyle.

An update coming from June 8th of 2013 states that The Arthur Conan Doyle Estate has failed to file a formal appearance or any other responsive pleading in the matter within the time granted to it.

Source: Internet.

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Indigenous Tweets helps keep endangered languages alive.

indegenous

Every 14 days, a language dies. But there’s a way to keep indigenous and minority languages alive: bring communities of speakers together.

A computer scientist and mathematics professor at St. Louis University, Kevin Scannell has been tracking the loss of languages. When we think about the severity of the situation, Kevin has to say this:

More than 1000 languages are listed as “severely” or “critically” endangered which means that only people in the grandparents’ generation or older still speak the language—without serious revitalization efforts, we expect these to die out with that oldest generation, in the very short term.

To help revitalize such indigenous tongues as Tamasheq, Dzhudezmo, and Anishinaabemowin, Kevin created Indigenous Tweets. The program scans Twitter for three-character sequences called “3-grams” that serve as a kind of fingerprint for statistical identification. The results are grouped by language and by Tweeter. So far, the program has uncovered more than 250 languages on Twitter, of which 139 could be considered minority or indigenous. The discoveries reflect real people speaking these languages today, not just translations of texts stored online.

Through Indigenous Tweets, those who speak minority languages can find accounts to follow — and potential conversation partners.

*In 2011 Kevin was on sabbatical at Twitter working in search relevance. He has since returned to teaching full time.

Donate to help save endangered languages at National Geographic.

Source: Internet.

 

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Meet Charlie Loyd : The guy who got a job because of a tweet.

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Charlie Loyd, a self-described satellite image enthusiast, perfected a better way to make maps with his customized approach to cloudless imagery.

He tweeted a sample of his work to five top mapping companies. One of them, MapBox, replied within three minutes.

That Tweet led to a phone call, an in-person interview, and ultimately, a job offer.

While Charlie’s experience happened very quickly, this isn’t the first time someone has landed a job because of a tweet. Job seekers use Twitter for industry-specific networking chats (see this community-built public Google doc for a list of times and industries) and as a way to highlight their best work.

It’s not just job-seekers who use Twitter. Increasingly, employers use Twitter for real-time recruiting. For instance, National Public Radio uses Twitter to find people who are the right match with the company’s needs and ethos. The organization’s head of talent acquisition, Lars Schmidt, observes:

“Successful recruiting campaigns are not just a broadcast of jobs. They are active campaigns to engage and interact with fans and prospects who are interested in the organization.”

His team developed a hashtag campaign to deliver an unfiltered view—straight from NPR employees—that gives prospective job seekers an authentic glimpse into the company culture.

He also points out that companies can use the platform to get an initial idea of the personality and communication styles of a potential hire by listening:

“There are companies who are listening and companies who are just broadcasting. How someone behaves on Twitter can be an indicator on how they will behave on the team.”

If you’re looking for a job:

Connect: Follow people in your field. Ask intelligent questions and follow up with links to your best work. Add a link to your portfolio or resume in your Twitter profile. Make sure your photo is current.

If you’re an employer:

Participate: Host a Twitter chat to join an industry conversation. Demonstrate your commitment to the community with your time and effort. Don’t just list jobs; promote your company culture and values.

Be nimble: Monitor all of your company’s Twitter accounts to be able to respond immediately to promising candidates.

Make the first move: Seek out the best talent and take an active interest in their work. Ask thoughtful questions and offer to help facilitate a conversation with a shared connection, either within your company or broader industry.

Source : Internet.

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