Meet Charlie Loyd : The guy who got a job because of a tweet.

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Charlie Loyd, a self-described satellite image enthusiast, perfected a better way to make maps with his customized approach to cloudless imagery.

He tweeted a sample of his work to five top mapping companies. One of them, MapBox, replied within three minutes.

That Tweet led to a phone call, an in-person interview, and ultimately, a job offer.

While Charlie’s experience happened very quickly, this isn’t the first time someone has landed a job because of a tweet. Job seekers use Twitter for industry-specific networking chats (see this community-built public Google doc for a list of times and industries) and as a way to highlight their best work.

It’s not just job-seekers who use Twitter. Increasingly, employers use Twitter for real-time recruiting. For instance, National Public Radio uses Twitter to find people who are the right match with the company’s needs and ethos. The organization’s head of talent acquisition, Lars Schmidt, observes:

“Successful recruiting campaigns are not just a broadcast of jobs. They are active campaigns to engage and interact with fans and prospects who are interested in the organization.”

His team developed a hashtag campaign to deliver an unfiltered view—straight from NPR employees—that gives prospective job seekers an authentic glimpse into the company culture.

He also points out that companies can use the platform to get an initial idea of the personality and communication styles of a potential hire by listening:

“There are companies who are listening and companies who are just broadcasting. How someone behaves on Twitter can be an indicator on how they will behave on the team.”

If you’re looking for a job:

Connect: Follow people in your field. Ask intelligent questions and follow up with links to your best work. Add a link to your portfolio or resume in your Twitter profile. Make sure your photo is current.

If you’re an employer:

Participate: Host a Twitter chat to join an industry conversation. Demonstrate your commitment to the community with your time and effort. Don’t just list jobs; promote your company culture and values.

Be nimble: Monitor all of your company’s Twitter accounts to be able to respond immediately to promising candidates.

Make the first move: Seek out the best talent and take an active interest in their work. Ask thoughtful questions and offer to help facilitate a conversation with a shared connection, either within your company or broader industry.

Source : Internet.

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About ajjwrites

You think you've got the whole world figured out, haven't you? I haven't. I'm ready to be surprised.

Posted on July 1, 2013, in Facebook, Funny, Inspirational, Motivationa, Social networking, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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