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The silent suffering

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Academy award winner Robin Williams was found lifeless in his apartment on 11th of august. The media reported that he was suffering from depression. On 12th of august it was announced that he cut his left hand wrists and he died due to asphyxiation because of hanging. Robin Williams was a comedy legend and also starred in amazing films like Dead poets Society, Jumanji, Good Will Hunting.

10 days ago I watched Williams The weapons of mass destruction standup and his standup was terribly funny. If he would’ve died normally, the world would’ve been sad but he passed away, unfortunately, because of depression. Williams’ death should be a wakeup call to everyone. You don’t have to seem sad to be depressed. Depression and all mental illness are very serious. People learn how to cope with it but that doesn’t mean they’re okay. This is a time to reach out to people you know that suffer from depression or mental illnesses and tell them that no matter what you’re here for them whenever they need support.

It’s sad that one of the funniest people in the world had to die for people to realize that depression is an actual illness.

“There were a lot of comments on Twitter about how much Robin Williams was loved and what a shame that he didn’t know it. I didn’t know Robin Williams, but I bet he did know that he was loved. I know that I am loved. Maybe not on a Robin Williams scale, but I have friends and family who would do anything for me, and I absolutely know this. But there comes a point where love does not matter. When things are bad, I don’t care that people love me. All I can see is that I’m a burden, that everything I have ever done is wrong, and that these good people who love me are wrong as well. At my lowest, love cannot save me. Hope, prayers, daily affirmations—none of these can save me. Therapy and medicine are what matter, and those don’t always work either.” –Molly Pohlig

Here’s a series of tweets by a twitter user telling the world to treat depression as an illness. depression tweets

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An advice for 2014.

The year 2013 is gonna end? Is it? Isn’t it a bit too early for this year to end? So many questions and not many answers. 😦

I’m writing this in the middle of the night on my phone. I am tired and i can’t sleep. So, i am gonna give you an advice which comes to you FREE! FREE! FREE! I’ve got some great things lined up for myself and my followers in the next year. I know you do too! I can’t wait to hear your new years resolutions on Facebook.

Do what you love. Keep your brain sharp and read this:

There will always be setbacks. You will make mistakes. Others will also do the same. You are not born on this earth to entertain anyone. You can’t please everyone! There will be some people who will try to keep you on their level when they see you trying to rise ahead. Stay true to what you are and why you’re doing it. That’s what makes you a true person. Find compelling reasons to continue when the going gets tough.

Do what you love because you love it, not to please other people! Dream it. Believe it. Achieve it.

Welcome! This is 2014.

Long Live Revolution: The Story of Sardar Bhagat Singh (2)

Long Live Revolution

Long Live Revolution

It is not the purpose here to trace the history of the revolutionary movement in India. Up to 1914 there were scattered secret organizations, mostly in the province of Bengal, but some outside it also. On the outbreak of the World War, the various organizations saw an opportunity to raise the standard of rebellion throughout India. With this purpose, such eminent revolutionaries as Rash Bihari Bose, Jatin Mukherjee, Sachin Sanyal, V. G. Pingley, Sardar Kartar Singh, Thakur Prithwi Singh, Baba Sohan Singh and others joined together and made elaborate plans in conjunction with some Sikh and Rajput regiments to bring about an armed revolution in India.

But as destiny ordained it, the whole plan tailed through inner treachery, except a formidable rising at Singapore which was subdued by means of Japanese warships and Japanese mariners. As soon as the authorities got scent of the plan of the revolutionaries, the regiments suspected of complicity in the contemplated risings were disarmed and disbanded, and armed European pickets were posted around them. These soldiers were then sent over to the severest fighting zones in France. The Defense of India Act was at once proclaimed, and more than 7000 persons were arrested in the Punjab, U. P. and Bengal.

By 1916, the revolutionary organizations were scorched, though not actually killed. By this time another influence had appeared in the field of Indian politics in the person of M K Gandhi. His idealism and his sacrifice appealed greatly,to the minds of the youths, many of whom began to join in his non-cooperation movement. But the “Bardoli Retreat,” .as it was termed by the revolutionaries, and the subsequent set-back in the non-cooperation movement again gave impetus to the revolutionary movement. By 1924 we again see the springing up of secret revolutionary organizations. In Bengal, as usual, the old revolutionaries began to organize again, but a heavy blow was dealt to them by the Bengal Ordinance of 1925.  In U. P. and the Punjab, the different parties organized by Sachindra Nath Sanyal, Jogesh Chandra Chatterjee, Pandit Ram Prasad Bismil etc., combined and formed one party.

At a meeting at Allahabad, a constitution was adopted and the name of the party became “Hindusthan Republican Association.” It was this organization that Bhagat Singh joined when he shifted to Cawnpore. His party name then became “Balwant,” under which name he used to contribute articles occasionally to the magazines .Cawnpore was then the headquarters of Jogesh Chandra Chatterjee, or Mr. Roy as his party-name was, was the Chief Organizer of the party and it was under Jogesh Chatterjee that Bhagat Singh began to work.

In 1926 (August 1925 is the date)  occurred the well-known Kakori train dacoity, in which the members of the H. R. A. held up a running train at Kakori near Lucknow, and looted the government cash that was being carried in that train. Vigorous police investigations into this affair led to ramifications of a wide-spread revolutionary organization, and the subsequent Kakori Conspiracy Case revealed many of their secrets. It was at this time that Bhagat Singh went back to Lahore.

Long Live Revolution: The Story of Sardar Bhagat Singh (1)

Bhagat_Singh_at_11

Sardar Bhagat Singh comes of a well-known Sikh family from the district of Lyallpur. His ancestors were Khalsa Sardars who, under Maharaja Ranjit Singh, helped in the spread of the Sikh Kingdom against the turbulent Pathans on the west and the dangerous English on the east. For helping the Sikh rulers with life and blood, this family was rewarded with considerable land.

Bhagat Singh’s grandfather, Sardar Arjun Singh was a big landlord. Though more than 80 years old, he is still strong and used to take keen interest in the proceedings of the Lahore Conspiracy Case. He is full of nationalist spirit. His brother’s son (son of Surjan Singh), Sardar Bahadur Dilbagh Singh and others, through their services to the Government, have grown rich and are now prosperous and men of rank and title. But Sardar Arjun Singh chose another path which inevitably leads to poverty and obscurity. The grandmother of Sardar Bhagat Singh, Smt. Jaikaur, is a typical old woman of Hindu family. It is she who has brought up all her sons and grandsons. She is a very brave lady; still she talks of Sufi Amba Prasad, one of the pioneer nationalists of India, who used to visit them. Once the police came to arrest Sufi Sahib, while he was in the house of Sardar Arjun Singh. But the brave lady saved him by a clever trick.

Sardar Arjun Singh had three sons, Sardar Kishen Singh, Sardar Ajit Singh and Sardar Swaran Singh. All the three brothers are known throughout the Punjab for their sincere love of country. Their patriotism has stood the severest test of imprisonment, banishment and poverty.

It was Sardar Ajit Singh who is reputed to have drawn Lala Lajpat Rai to the field of political service for the motherland. Though quite rich, Sardar Ajit Singh forsook the comforts of a home-life and began to organize the Punjab for political emancipation. At this time, i.e., about 1904 and 1905, the partition of Bengal came as Godsend. The violent and continued agitation in Bengal over this act of Lord Curzon had reverberations in the distant Punjab where Lala Lajpat Rai, Sardar Ajit Singh and Sufi Amba Prasad (a great friend of Ajit Singh) began to rouse up the country by eloquent speeches. In this agitation Sardar Kishen Singh, the eldest of the brothers and father of Sardar Bhagat Singh, and Swaran Singh the youngest, took a legitimate share. Though Sardar Kishen Singh did not figure brilliantly on the platform, his services to the cause of the regeneration of the country were more solid. Both the father and the uncles of Bhagat Singh, with the willing consent of the grandfather, contributed generously to the national fund.

The year 1907 saw for the first time in the history of modern India the application of the arbitrary Regulation III of 1818, which has since then rendered so much service to the British Government in India. Both Bengal and Punjab were the scenes of the application of this drastic measure, and Sardar Ajit Singh and Lala Lajpat Rai were recipients of this honor. After suffering imprisonment without trial for about a year in the distant and unhealthy Burma, Sardar Ajit Singh came back to Punjab. It was about the same time that Bhagat Singh’s father and uncle, Sardars Kishen Singh and Swaran Singh, were arrested and imprisoned for seditious speeches, and were thus the pioneers in the line. The uncle, Swaran Singh, who was then hardly 28, soon died in the Jail (1910). And this was the propitious time when Sardar Bhagat Singh, the second son of the family, was born, on a Saturday, 28th September, 1907, in the early hours of the morning. Was it a mere coincidence or the hand of God!

Of his boyhood not much is known except that he loved the field much better than the class room. He, with his eldest brother, Jagat Singh, joined the Primary School at Banga, district Lyallpur, which was his birth place.

Jagat Singh died at the age of 11 years, a loss which was keenly felt by the boy Bhagat Singh. After this Sardar Kishen Singh shifted to Nawankot near Lahore where he had some land. Bhagat Singh had now to be admitted to some High School. Though it was customary for the Sikhs to join the Khalsa High School, Sardar Kishen Singh had no liking for the School owing to the loyalist tendencies of its authorities. So Bhagat Singh joined the D. A. V. School, Lahore. Although the incident is so simple yet it is significant that though a pious Sikh, Bhagat Singh’s father withdrew his son from a Sikh institution and preferred an Arya Samajist School. From this School, he passed the Matriculation Examination and joined the National College which is now in the building of the Bradlaugh Hall. When he was in the 9th class he went to attend the Cawnpore Congress. (Actually his father took him to Balgaum Congress held in 1924, presided by M K Gandhi) While in the College he was very intimate with Sukhdeo and Yashpal. (when hardly 12 year old he went to Amritsar following Jallianwala Bagh killings by General Dyer and brought blood socked soil)

When not yet fourteen, Bhagat Singh’s enthusiasm for the service of country brought him into touch with some revolutionary organization in the Punjab. After the failure of the non-cooperation movement in 1921, many impatient young men sought to resort to other methods than those advocated by M K Gandhi for the realization of their ideal. In the Punjab a sect had arose, known as Babbar Akalis.  They advocated the use of violent methods for the emancipation of the country. Though they resorted to means which may not be approved by many, the Babbar Akalis contained among them some truly noble characters. Moreover, the heroic sacrifices of the Sikhs in the Lahore Conspiracy Cases of 1914 and 1915 had great influence on the imaginative youths of the period. That they had very great effect on the emotional nature of Sardar Bhagat Singh is very well proved from the later writings of his. It should also be remembered that Bhagat’s father, Sardar Kishen Singh also, was actively helping the revolutionary organizations of 1914-15. In the book, “India as I knew It” by Sir Michael O’Dwyer, there are definite references to it, so much so that it is definitely stated that Sardar Kishen Singh advanced thousands of rupees to the revolutionary leaders. It is for these alleged crimes that Sardar Kishen Singh was interned under the Defense of India Act. Like father, like son, and it is no wonder that young Bhagat Singh drifted towards the violent revolutionary path of the Babbar Akalis.

As usually happens with secret organizations, the police got clue of the activities of this party and most of its members were arrested. It was partly to avoid police scrutiny, partly to find out a new field of activity that Bhagat Singh left the Punjab and went to reside at Cawnpore. Here he came into touch with Shri Ganesh Shanker Vidyarthi, and the two formed a life-long friendship. This was a turning point in his life, as since then he became part and parcel of a well-organized revolutionary party in India. Henceforth his life was part of a story of the revolutionary movement in India, and it now behooves us to give some account of this revolutionary organization to which Bhagat Singh dedicated his heart and soul.

The image of india throught the mind of an Indian.

this article is not written by me but i was very much inspired to tell you guys the good parts. So, I’m posting this on 15th August, the Indian Independence day. Dont take it too seriously, if you expect this article to be patriotic then I’m SORRY!

India, the world’s biggest democrazy, is an Asian mishmash composed of dirt, swamp, sparks, haze, spice, mind, ignorance, enlightenment, bliss, discrimination and egos all wrapped tightly in the void.  It is an ancient conch-shell shaped land-mass surrounded by Pakistan to the West, Bangladesh to the East, China to the North East, Nepal to the North, Sri Lanka to the South, the Bay of Bengal to the West, with the smog above, the dead ancestors below, and which is directly accessible from most anywhere by foot.

Capital of India: New Delay.

Official language of India: Hinglish, Hindi, Urdu, Marathi, Bengali, Sanskrit, plus 7243 colloquial dialects.

Government of India: None. Utter mother flipping chaos!

Declaration of Independence: still struggling.

Currency: Cow, Dung, Rupee.

Religion: But, of course.

Creation start date: Eternity. In the beginning was the word, and the word was with God, and the word was OM. Using this sexy little symbol the Supreme Being conjured up the material existence in one colossal big bag which resulted in matter infused with spirits and vise versa. Actually it is a bit more complex than that. God sprouted a lotus from his navel and from there sprang forth Brahma, the created creator. Brahma looked all around and could only see water. So he thought WTF? And proceeded to torture himself so severely that God appeared before him and asked WTF? Brahma told God that he wanted to do his thing, but just plain forgot. With that God cast his casual-glance upon Brahma and thence forth appeared Grade A “Potli”. Brahma immediately drank some “Potli” and got so intoxicated that he had it all figured out, where upon he created India. As the ions passed many alien-incarnations appeared to try and talk sense into the dinosaurs, but it wasn’t until an alien shagged a dinosaur, whose off-spring in turn impregnated a monkey, that the DNA of man & women appeared from the muck and populated the land.

The British lads, obsessed as they were with a New World Order, saw India and decided they wanted it. Oy Vey! It was theirs for the taking. And the plunder began. This led to poverty among the monkey men which persisted until one bald man took over. The Mahatma said that monkey men must not fight for independence, rather they should strike for independence. His idea was that this would confuse the British, even though they were all employed by the British. The plan worked, and ended up not only confusing the British but even the Indians themselves who got fired from their jobs, leaving them all unemployed, ending up in even greater poverty.

The biggest problem that this bald man did not anticipate was that India, being a subcontinent of billions of everything, would go on to want independence from itself as well. Apparently a common interest in all things curry was not enough to unite a nation or maintain peace with neighboring states. There was only one solution, something that has kept the Indians united and reduced the number of casualties from fighting across the meaningless man-made borders separating village from water source, home from outhouse, and temple from gurudwara. Of course the mystical answer was Bollywood. It doesn’t matter what caste, religion, language or culture the modern Indian hails from, absolutely no one with a TV could be bothered fighting when they could tune into the constant stream of low budget cinema being beamed into their cow-dung encrusted slums.

In India if you want any one to work for you then you actually have to pay them. Yes, it is quite shocking. Such misbehaviour and naked greed were unthinkable in the non-Indian world. Imagine, in the land of India you actually have to pay to play. What more needs to be said about corruption. Better to stay home and wash your own dishes in India.

When not being discriminated by any foreign power, the caste system exists which allows the Indian populace to discriminate against each other. This is called Varna-dharma or the shit-list. People in India are classified as either a godman (Brahmin), a bully (Kshatriya), a merchant (Vaisya), or a dirt bag (Sudra). And this is NOT based on birth-right. It is based solely on manifest qualities or lack thereof, viz., birth-wrong.

Humor, although non-existent in India, never-the-less does exist there. And rather than bore you with genres, an example Indian joke should suffice to establish that India is no laughing matter. Once upon a time a poor Indian farmer in Bihar was trying to plant an egg farm. The fellow planted eggs and watered then, day after day, but all to no avail. So the farmer went to the government office to complain. After meeting with one Indian bureaucrat and telling his story he was advised that nothing could be done without a soil sample. Case closed.

Indians eat spice. They drink spice, smoke spice, sweat spice, fart spice, and even shit spice. Sometimes if you order it specially you can get food intermixed with all these spices, but you must insist on it while ordering in public restaurants.
Indian food comes in two different dishes, basically containing the same ingredients, curry, and matter. Combined with the 2,375 different flavours of spice though, an Indian dinner can be combined in 10 ^ 87 different ways, giving more tastes than there are taste buds in the mouth. This makes all Indian food end up in tasting unusually spicy, since what the taste buds can detect are basically nuked by all the manifold sensations attacking them.

As you can’t write or do mathematics without something to write with, the primary export of India is ink, which is produced in massive quantities by the Indian held megacorporation India Inc.[6] for worldwide export. This makes India one of the world’s most powerful countries — if Indians wanted, they could render all printers obsolete.
Some profane minds that fancy eating beef have conjectured elsewhere that the reason behind the phenomenal explosion of the cow population in India is because Indians do not eat cows. That’s like saying that the reason behind the exponential growth of humans in India is because cows do not eat humans; or are too busy taking calls from mindless, frustrated Americans; or too busy building the digital cow milking machine for future generations who are too busy breathing in and out.
A large part of the Indian economy is dependent on Mumbai and Bollywood. It is also dependent on a small workers, otherwise known as children in other parts of the world. All volunteer to leave boring school to work 24/7 to supply clothes to rich people who only buy designer garments with the label ‘Hand Woven’ on them.

Not satisfied with merely inventing writing and mathematics, Indians took their combined love of communication, their numerous Gods and their love lives, and their love of partying, and creating the most powerful art form that exists today: Bollywood movies.
Bollywood is a very popular film industry and is as popular as Hollywood and is known all over India. They make the worst films in the world. A film is released every 15 minutes. There are no topics in Bollywod movies except for stupid love stories in which uncultured, undisciplined actresses dance shaking their 50 inch booties to the hollow tint of prerecorded music, replete with the sounds of gunfire.
Virtually everyone watches them, including lesbian high school girls and over-sized, middle-aged, old-age housewives. The primary reason for the continuation of the boom in the cinema industry in India is that it’s cheaper to pay to sleep in the cool confines of a cinema hall than to pay to crash in a hotel for up to Rs. 3.
Bollywood is also a pastime for Indians. It was invented by Reena Malhotra, a woman who was born with elephantiasis in Kolkata and who sold postcards in Mumbai. It is believed that she asked her rich uncle for a loan on her 18th birthday and got enrolled in an Academy for Visual Arts. Somehow she learned something there to someway return to Mumbai to sometime start Bollywood. All the rest is fiction.
According to a famous film critic, who says this on the condition of anonymity fearing murder, until recently Bollywood denied the existence of sex. Any and every intimate scene, if ever it passed the censor boards, was depicted by two flowers rubbing against each other with their private areas blurred out. The censored rape scenes involved thunder and lightning or huge tidal waves hitting the rocks.